2020 Online Festival

Due to the Covid-19 related postponement of the New Zealand International Science Festival, the festival team has been curating and will be frequently updating a 'digital festival' experience which can be enjoyed at home while New Zealand is in lockdown.

Why don't perpetual motion machines ever work?

Perpetual motion machines have captured many inventors’ imaginations. There’s just one problem: they don’t work.

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That Time It Rained for Two Million Years

At the beginning of the Triassic Period the world is hot, flat, and very dry. But then 234 million years ago, the climate suddenly changed for the wetter.

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How the Ibex defies gravity

The spectacular sight of mountain goats defying gravity on a vertical dam wall in Italy, and all because they are have a craving for some of Earth's elements essential to life.

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To Scale: The Solar System

On a dry lakebed in Nevada, a group of friends build the first scale model of the solar system with complete planetary orbits: a true illustration of our place in the universe.

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Why all world maps are wrong

Making accurate world maps is mathematically impossible.

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How to brush your teeth in space

Canadian astronaut and Commander of Expedition 35 Chris Hadfield answers a question about how astronauts brush their teeth in space. You might be surprised by what he reveals!

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Best of Science Max

Science Max brings you a special compilation including some of our favourite episodes from season 1. Tune in and prepare for a heap of science madness!

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From Egg to Frog - an odyssey

The development of Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) eggs to froglets in 49 days, just 7 weeks!

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Slow Motion Bead Chain Experiment

Steve Mould, the science guy from Britain's Brightest, to explore the science behind the "self siphoning beads" - also known as "Newton's Beads".

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The Zodiac Constellations

Gemini, Sagittarius, Scorpio? You've heard of them and now is your chance to get to know them a little more.

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Rocky Shore Colouring Book

Discover the creatures that live between the tides on the rocky shore and in the shallow coastal waters of New Zealand

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Brilliant Bird Masks

Cut yours out, put it on and get social! If you have friends overseas, why not encourage them to join in, too?

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Evolution of Television

In 100 years, the TV has taken many shapes and sizes. Here's the history of the television, from the 1920s to today.

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The secrets hiding in banknotes

From UV ink to mysterious donuts; from grinning devils to shy spiders - these banknotes are hiding unbelievable secrets.

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The science of Spiciness

When you take a bite of a hot pepper, your body reacts as if your mouth is on fire... why?

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The chemistry of Cookies

You stick cookie dough into an oven, and magically, you get a plate of warm, gooey cookies. Except it's not magic; it's science.

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Dr. Seuss meets Dr. Dre

Wes Tank raps Dr. Seuss' classic children's book "The Lorax" over Dr. Dre's legendary hip hop beats for "Still D.R.E.", "California Love" and "Lil' Ghetto Boy"

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60 Second Science Adventures

David Mitchell presents a series of science adventures on topics ranging from the Big Bang, to Citizen Science, to thought.

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Citizen Science: Everybody Counts

Science is not just for scientists. There are ways that everyone can be involved and contribute.

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A Momentous Technological Feat

Tens of thousands of spectators made the pilgrimage from across the United States & 22 million people around the world on Youtube witnessed the thunderous roar of the SpaceX's new jumbo rocket.

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That's here. That's home. That's us.

Carl Sagan's poignant reflection of our position of the universe, inspired by the most distant photo of earth ever taken.

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Sink or Float with Blippi

Blippi takes you for a journey to see what items sink or float.

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How Radio Broadcast Works

How does sound travel to your radio?

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Exploring Neptune and Uranus

Are there planets in our solar system on which life is possible

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The Secrets of Light and Energy

This BBC science documentary on the secrets of light and energy quantum physics, highlights the formation, transference and storage of energy as well as how light is reflected and "created".

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When NASA Sent A Message To Aliens

n September 1977, NASA launched Voyager I from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The craft carried a golden record that contained a message to aliens from the people of Earth. Here's what it said.

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Science and Nature School

Join Sesame Street's Murray at Science and Nature school to learn something new!

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Weird Jobs: Dung Detective

Get the scoop on poop! Go with biological conservationists as they study animal behaviour and health through poop.

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Everything you need to know about Monkeys

Think you know everything there is about monkeys? Think again!

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The First Moon Walk

Fascinating facts about the first time man set foot on the moon.

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Hanging Out With Chinstrap Penguins

Chinstrap penguins might be cute, but they like to cause mischief.

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Revolutionising medical science with sheep

Chemist Louis Pasteur was challenged to prove that invisible agents (germs) caused diseases, and he did so by using sheep.

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Volcanoes 101

About 1,500 active volcanoes can be found around the world. Learn about the major types of volcanoes, the geological process behind eruptions, and where the most destructive volcanic eruption ever witnessed occurred.

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The Sacrifice of Cassini

Explore the creation of planetary rings with Neil deGrasse Tyson and discover the fate of the Cassini space probe.

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Legendary Instruments with Jean Michel Jarre

Synthesiser legend Jean Michel Jarre talks you through the massive machines that he used for his breakout record Oxygene

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STEM career fortune teller

Download, print and make this STEM fortune teller and find your weird and wonderful STEM career.

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Let's Fly

Sabrina shows us how to do just that by going back to our original problem at the gorge.

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Scroll the Ocean

Scroll the depths of the ocean from your dry home

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The bizarre physics of fire ants

They're not just an animal, they're a material. And that's got engineers interested.

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The World's Lightest Solid

Aerogels are the world's lightest (least dense) solids.

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Weather and Erosion

Real world examples of how the Hydrosphere and Geosphere affect each other

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Talking Elephant?

Talking elephants are not just fictional characters in Dumbo.

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Journey to the Earth’s Core

The center of the Earth lies about 4,000 miles below its surface, so it’s gonna be a long trip.

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The trick that made animation realistic

Explore the beginning of rotoscoping, a technique animators can use to create realistic motion.

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Cawthron Institute Science at Home

Jonathan Puddic - Cawthron scientist will deliver a Science at Home webisode series. This is a special initiative from Cawthron Institute for the nation-wide Covid-19 lock-down period.

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First CGI

The first CGI in movies was inspired by some of the first photos of Mars. This is how it worked.

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Is there an Ocean in the House?

At home practical science to investigate and explore our ocean world.

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Australia Zoo Virtual Tour

Join Robert Irwin to see what wildlife encounters await at Australia Zoo - it's as wild as life gets!

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Food Chains

How do we get energy? And how does one animal get energy from another animal, or a plant. It's all about food chains and food webs in this Crash Course Kids Compilation.

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World's smallest cat

A rusty spotted cat, the world's smallest cat, explores his forest home in Sri Lanka, but his natural curiosity is destined to get him into a spot of trouble.

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The 1995 Hubble photo that changed astronomy

The Hubble Deep Field, explained by the man who made it happen.

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Science is for everyone, kids included

What do science and play have in common? Neuroscientist Beau Lotto thinks all people (kids included) should participate in science and, through the process of discovery, change perceptions.

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Earth Cake

How to make and decorate your very own edible planet

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Dinosaur footprint biscuits

These Dinosaur Footprint Cookies are such a fun edible treat for all your little dinosaur lovers.

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Easy DIY Experiments

Learn Easy DIY Science Experiments for Kids.

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Space Compilation

Sabrina talks to us about the Sun, stars, the universe, and how constellations work.

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Ant Picnic

Ants snack choices tell scientists something about the food that’s available to them in nature.

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ELIZA Talking

Talk to the world's original chat bot

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Quick, Draw!

Can AI guess what you're drawing?

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Why we get sick

Why do we get sick? Learn the importance of washing your hands!

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Virtual Conductor

Semi-Conductor is an experiment that lets you conduct your own orchestra through your browser.

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Cold process soap making

In under fifteen minutes you can make a basic bar soap from scratch, using only organic olive and coconut oils, lye, and ice water.

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Raising Pandas - It's complicated

In the 1960s, only 30 percent of infant pandas born at breeding centers survived. Today 90 percent survive. So, what changed?

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Walking water experiment

Learn about how water travel up the paper towels through a process called capillary action.

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